Summer Dispatch From The Telenav Map Team

It has been an exciting summer! Besides our regular work, there was the annual State of the Map conference that we were all really looking forward to. We launched a new ImproveOSM web site. OpenStreetCam dash-cams are distributed to OSM US members. And more. Read all about it in our Summer Dispatch below!

State of the Map

Quite a few of us got to go to State of the Map in Milan, Italy! Our team hosted four presentations at the conference, and we are really happy with the interest and feedback we received. We made a lot of new map friends as well!

All SOTM presentations were recorded and posted on YouTube, so if you missed any of us, you can watch the presentations at your leisure:

Alina and Bogdan presenting our Machine Learning stack at SOTM 2018

We also had a booth at the conference where we talked about ImproveOSM and OpenStreetCam, and where 6 lucky winners received a Waylens OpenStreetCam dashboard camera!

Excited crowd right before one of the Waylens cameras is being given away!

Mapping

We continue to map in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. As always you can track our work on GitHub. We have been focusing a lot on adding missing road names for the larger metropolitan areas in the US. Our typical workflow is to identify local government road centerline data sources, verify the license, process them with Cygnus to find changed / new names, and manually add the names if we can verify them.

Local road centerline data the team identified in Colorado

We are excited that the US community is looking to build an overview of available road centerline databases from (local) governments. We hope the ones we identified can help bootstrap this initiative.

We also published some MapRoulette challenges around this topic. 

ImproveOSM

Right on time for State of the Map, we launched a complete redesign of improveosm.org, our portal for everything Telenav❤️OSM. The new site gives you quick access to our OSM initiatives, data and tools. Check it out!We also released more than 20 thousand new missing roads locations. These are added to the existing database of currently more than 2.4 million missing road locations. An easy way to start editing based on these locations is to download the ImproveOSM plugin for JOSM.

Locations of the new Missing Roads locations

OpenStreetCam

The steady growth of OpenStreetCam continues. Almost 4.5 million kilometers of trips are in the OSC database. This amounts to about 165 million images!

We started a collaboration with OpenStreetMap US to run a Camera Lending program. Through the program, OSM US members can apply to borrow a custom Waylens Horizon camera for up to three months. The camera captures high resolution images for OSC and uploads them automatically. Almost 20 mappers have a camera already, and they have driven about 30 thousand kilometers in the past couple of months!

The passenger’s seat of our Camera Man ToeBee, as he gets ready to dispatch a bunch of Waylens cameras

That’s a wrap for our summer dispatch folks! Thanks for reading and keep an eye on the blog for more from the Telenav Map Team. Be sure to follow us on Twitter as well @improveOSM and @openstreetcam. 👋🏼

 

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Map Metrics for OSM are now available

Telenav’s OSM team just released a portal where you can view different metrics on OSM.

Unlike other metrics views that are already available, this new tool for the OSM community is focused especially on navigation attributes like length of navigable roads, number of turn restrictions, signposts and many more, in total 22 of such metrics are available. You can check it out at https://metrics.improveosm.org

About the data

Metrics are computed weekly and should be available on the portal at the end of each week. Metrics are generated for the whole world using as input the planet pbf downloaded from the official mirrors made available by OSM community

Metrics are available starting with 8th February 2016. In the top left corner, you can choose to see them by week, by month or by quarter. We also have a nice feature for all OSM enthusiasts! For each metric in the left menu you have a small info button where you see exactly what the metric means: complete description and the rules we applied when computing them, which tags where used, if we counted ways, nodes or relations etc.

How do we do it?

The platform was built using Apache Spark. Using big data technologies enabled us to have metrics for the whole world: on countries, states, counties and a few metropolitan areas (metros are available only in North America for now). In order to use Apache Spark, we had to convert pbf to parquet first, so we achieved this using a parquetizer that is open source and can be found here.  After we have the parquets, using Spark’s DataFrame API we managed to have these metrics available in just a couple of hours.

We have also made the latest parquet files available for general use here.

If you have any suggestions or feedback, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can find details in the About section.

Happy mapping!

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New version of OpenStreetCam JOSM plugin with sign detections

This post also appears on my OSM diary.

The Telenav OSM team just released a new version of the OpenStreetCam JOSM plugin. The major new feature is the ability to show and manipulate street sign detections. Images in only a few areas are currently processed for sign detection, so it’s not very likely that you will see anything yet, but that will change over time as we catch up processing over 140 million images.

screen

To enable detections, right-click on the OpenStreetCam layer in the Layers panel, and check ‘Detections’ under ‘Data to display’. You can filter the detections by the following criteria:

  • Not older than — show only detections (or images) from that date or newer.
  • Only mine — show only detections / images from my own OSM / OSC account.
  • OSM Comparison — show detections based on comparison with OSM data:
    • Same data — Only show signs that have corresponding tags / data already mapped in OSM
    • New data — Only show signs that do not have corresponding data in OSM and need to be mapped
    • Changed data — Only show signs that have existing tags in OSM but the value is different (for example a 50 km/h sign and the OSM way is mapped as 60 km/h)
    • Unknown — No match could be made between the detected sign and OSM data
  • Edit status — show detections based on manually set status of the detection:
    • Open — new detection, status not changed yet
    • Mapped — manually marked as mapped
    • Bad sign — manually marked as a bad detection
    • Other — other status
  • Detection type — show only signs of the selected types.
  • Mode — Show only automatic detections, manually tagged detections, or both.

For the filters OSM Comparison, Edit status and Detection type, you can select multiple values by using shift-click and command/ctrl-click.

In the main editor window, you can select a sign to load the corresponding photo, which will show an outline of the detected sign. If there are multiple signs in an image, you can select the next one by clicking on the location again. (This is something we hope to improve.)

panel

In the new ‘OpenStreetMap detections’ panel, you can see metadata for the detection, and set the status to Mapped, Bad Detection, or Other. By marking signs that are not detected correctly as Bad Detection, you hide them from other mappers, and we will use that information to improve the detection system.

The plugin is available from the JOSM plugin list, and the source is on Github.

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Working with ImproveOSM Data Dumps

Our ImproveOSM pipeline produces a pretty impressive number of suggested roads missing from OSM, missing oneway tags, and missing turn restrictions, based on analysis of billions of GPS data points. We make the results available as frequent data dumps in CSV format. In this post, I want to look at a way to integrate this data into your OSM mapping workflow.

If you just want to see ImproveOSM data in JOSM wherever you are currently mapping, you can just use the ImproveOSM JOSM plugin. For advanced users who want more flexibility, or who want to use this data in different ways, this post offers some guidance.

The data dumps are available from here. For this example, I will work with the most recent Direction of Flow data file. This highlights ways with potential missing oneway tag. After downloading and unzipping it, you will have a CSV file of about 16.5 megabytes that looks like this:

wayId;fromNodeId;toNodeId;percentage;status;roadType;theGeom;numberOfTrips
148617028;1867720648;89191396;99.5378927911275;SOLVED;THROUGHWAY;LINESTRING(2.217821 48.922613,2.217719 48.922618,2.217408 48.922633);1082
33555379;322840377;322840383;98.6301369863014;INVALID;LOCAL_ROAD;LINESTRING(4.999815 47.34294,4.999957 47.343062,4.999965 47.34315);146
17271190;178942503;2341050872;100;OPEN;LOCAL_ROAD;LINESTRING(11.070503 50.139245,11.070525 50.139213,11.070616 50.139099,11.070693 50.139032);74
.....

Since the theGeom field is in WKT, you can import it as a layer in QGIS pretty easily. Let’s fire up QGIS (I use 2.18) and add a Delimited Text layer.

In the dialog, select the downloaded CSV file as the file source. Set the delimiter to semicolon. QGIS detected for me that the geometry was in the theGeom field, and of type WKT, but you can set that manually if needed:

Upon clicking OK, QGIS wants us to define which CRS the coordinates are defined in. Select WGS84.

Now, we have a layer of line geometries that correspond to OSM ways that may be missing a oneway tag.

To make the file more manageable, let’s limit our selection to one country. I get country boundaries from Natural Earth (a fantastic resource!). After adding the country borders to QGIS, I can perform a spatial query. Before you do this, select the country you are interested in. I pick Mexico as an example.

Bring up the Spatial Query window. If you don’t see this menu item, you will need to enable the Spatial Query plugin.

Select the ImproveOSM layer as the source, and the Natural Earth layer as the query layer. Make sure to check the ‘1 Selected geometries’ checkbox, so we limit our query to Mexico.

The matching features will now be selected in the ImproveOSM layer. Make sure that layer is selected in the Layers Panel before you select Layer -> Save As.. from the QGIS menu. In this dialog, choose GeoJSON as the output type. Select a destination filename. Make sure that the CRS is set to WGS84. Make sure the ‘Save only selected features’ is checked, and Save.

Now you have a GeoJSON file with all OSM way geometries that may need a oneway tag. You can load this file into JOSM, using its GeoJSON plugin. To organize your work going through these, I would recommend using the Todo plugin and add the GeoJSON features to the todo list.

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Cygnus – conflation at your fingertips!

This is a follow-up blogpost after the State Of the Map US 2017 conference held in Denver.

The process of conflation in GIS is defined as the act of merging two data layers to create one layer containing the features and attributes of both original layers.

Cygnus is a tool that compares external data with OSM, giving you a result file in JOSM XML format with all the changes. The comparison is made in a non-destructive way, so no OSM ways are ever deleted or degraded.

Workflow

NOTE – The license compatibility between the local data file and OSM has to be taken into account before adding anything in OSM. Also, please follow the OSM import procedures if you are planning to add external data to OSM.

First of all you need to have a shapefile with local data in WGS84 spatial reference. This shapefile has to be filtered in different ways, depending on the tags you want to compare. For example, if you want to compare oneways, make sure to have a flow-direction/oneway/etc. attribute in the shapefile.

Translation

The first thing that has to be taken care of is to assure a proper attribute translation. I created a simple example for this exercise. I don’t want to get neck-deep in too many technical details so the main focus remains the process as a whole. I kept the attribute information for this example straightforward:

In order to create an OSM file from this data, I wrote a simple translation file that will be used together with ogr2osm.

Next, run the below command to obtain the OSM file.

python ogr2osm.py simple_streets.shp -t simple_translation.py -o simple_output.osm

Finally, I converted the OSM file to PBF using osmosis, because Cygnus requires a PBF file as input.

Cygnus goes to work!

Now that you have gone through the pre-processing of the local data file, we can offer it to Cygnus for processing. Note that your upload needs to be small-ish – the spatial extent needs to be smaller than 50×50 km and the file needs to be 20MB or smaller in size.

The interface of the Cygnus service is very simple – there are just two pages:

  • the home page where you add new jobs
  • the job queue page where you can see your progress and download the result

If your input file was uploaded successfully, Cygnus will go to work. Your job will be added to the back of the queue. When it’s your turn, Cygnus will read your PBF file, and download the OSM data for the same extent, using Overpass API. It will then compare your upload with the existing OSM data and produce the output file that you can download from the job queue.

NOTE – Everyone’s jobs are listed here, so be careful not to touch other users’ stuff.

Process the output in JOSM

Once Cygnus gives us the output, we can open it in JOSM and inspect it. This is by far the most important, and time consumig, step. Even though Cygnus does a best effort to connect ways where needed, it acts conservatively so it will not snap ways together that do not belong together.

Here are a few ways that got properly connected to the existing highway=secondary:

But there are situations where the distance was too far so Cygnus did not snap:

In this case, you need to manually connect the ways if that is appropriate.

When you are finally satisfied with your manually post-processed conflation result, you can go ahead and merge it with the OSM data and upload it!

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Mapping traffic signals and stop signs using MapRoulette

In our journey of improving  the OpenStreetMap we are constantly searching for  open source data. This search is very important and is done before we start improving the map in a new area.

Currently, part of our team is focused on improving the Detroit area. So, before we started mapping we searched for useful geospatial data and we came across open data about traffic signals and stop signs for Wayne County, Detroit. The data can be found here and here.

Traffic signals mapped in OSM
Stop signs mapped in OSM

We filtered out the traffic signals and stop signs that were already in OSM but there is still a significant amount of data that can be added in OSM. (912 – traffic signals and 8755 – stop signs). Due to this, we thought about creating a MapRoulette challenge.

About MapRoulette

MapRoulette is a micro-tasking tool used to fix bugs in OpenStreetMap and to improve it. A user can create tasks by uploading files which contain the location, ways, points with the error that has to be fixed or files with features that are missing from the map and can be added by other users.

When creating a new task, the user gives specific instructions on what steps have to be followed to edit through this tool. Once a user has logged in, he can see on the map the created challenge and the pins which consists of tasks he can solve.

So, given the available data that we found, we created two challenges – one for traffic signals and the other for stop signs. Some general rules for mapping traffic signals and stop signs can be found on the OSM wiki – here and here.

Tags that we use for mapping
  • Stop signs – highway=stop
  • Traffic signals – highway=traffic_signal
Notes
  • If the traffic signal/stop sign is referring to all the highways entering the intersection, we add the traffic signal/stop sign in the intersection point.

  • If the traffic signal/stop sign is not referring to all the highways entering the intersection we add the traffic signal/stop sign before the intersection, where the sign/signal is positioned.
  • We need to add an additional tag if the road is bidirectional:
    • for traffic signals we use the traffic_signals:direction key with the forward or backward values to indicate the affected direction.

    • for stop signs add direction=forward or direction=backward to indicate the affected direction.

The data has been published under Public Domain license.

Everyone who is keen on mapping is welcomed to help us.

Let’s improve OSM together!

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